Details of RopinoHerb PLMD
Gou teng’s “hooks” are said to “hook” the internal wind to calm muscle spasms, tics, tremors, and the like.

read about PLMD and RLS here… many of our patients take the herbs for both:  The cause of PLMD in Chinese Medicine.

Notes: RopinoHerb PLMD for periodic limb movements is based on Da Ding Feng Zhu (Major Arrest Wind Pearl). This formula first appeared in the text “Systemic Differentiation of Warm Disease” published in the year 1798. This formula uses heavy materials to weigh down the wind that blows through the body giving rise to the kicking and jerking movements.This formula also traditionally includes an egg yolk. The word “pearl” that shows up on this formula’s name is describing the egg yolk, not actually a pearl. The egg yolk is not added to the Eagle Herbs formula as my herb supplier does not offer this particular herb in extract powder form. I am not clear on whether or not it matters if the yolk was cooked in the tea with the other herbs or stirred in afterward. Either way, if you would like to add to the efficacy of this formula, eating the yolk of a hard boiled egg would make a certain amount of sense. Because of the potential of bacterial infections, raw egg yolk consumption is not encouraged.

Other ingredients added to the base formula assume other possible causes for internal wind that generates the tics, tremors, convulsions and other movements that would be more appropriate on a dance floor. While we usually focus on Yin deficiency of the Liver leading to internal wind, TCM practitioners never assume that any two people will present with the exact same cause for their internal wind. So, this formula also addresses a number of the lesser known but commonly found causes for internal wind. If you’d like a formula that addresses your specific cause of internal wind, you can look into an EagleHerbs.com Custom Formula just for you.

A customer writes: “Thanks again for your help for me.  I am still taking 8 Ropinoherb PLMD capsules and 4 Ropinoherb RLS capsules every day late afternoon.  I’m still hoping to be able to take less, but so far, that is what works.   My nighttime regimen includes a hot bath or shower followed by lavender/chamomile lotion.   I eat organically and limit my sodium and sugar intake to a bare minimum.  I never eat red meat or drink red wine, both of which trigger RLS attacks.   Occasionally I take some marijuana and I have a prescription for Carbadopa Levadopa which I call my “rescue” drug and take the night before I travel or have some event that requires me being rested.  I try not to take it more than once a month as it augments very quickly.

In summary, having struggled with RLS for 60 years (since the age of 9), I am the best I’ve ever been and I owe that largely to Eagle Herbs and you.  Thank you.  Thank you.”

 

Alternative Names

  • Da Ding Feng Zhu Jia Jian
  • Major Arrest Wind Pearl Modified

Ingredients

Bai Shao 白芍 white peony root, peony Paeoniae Radix alba [supports pregnancy]

  • Moisturizes Liver Sedates Tremors. This herb calms and nourishes the (TCM) Liver to calm the nerves and extinguish internal wind (those tics, tremors, and convulsions that define PLMD).

Gou Teng 芶藤 stems of gambir vine; gambir, uncaria vine Ramulus Uncariae cum Uncis

  • Hooks Wind Calms Spasm. Gou Teng is an interesting little herb that is a hook on the stem of the plant. It is said to “hook wind”. In short, it sedates wind which means addresses tics and tremors. It is also used to lower blood pressure.

Gui Ban 龜板 deep fried plastrum testudinis Testudinis Plastrum [don’t use if pregnant]

  • Heavy Herb Sedates Wind. Sometimes internal wind can be addressed with herbs that are heavy, the idea being that by nourishing the yin, the wind will be anchored down and not allowed to blow around the body causing tics and tremors. Think of this as spraying water on to a dusty road. With the water, the dust is anchored down and can’t blow around.

Bie Jia 鱉甲 Chinese soft-shelled turtle shell (dorsal aspect) Trionycis Carapax [don’t use if pregnant]

  • Heavy Shell Sedates Wind. This is another herb that works like the tortoise shell above. Nourishes yin and anchors yang which can give rise to wind if it gets too restless.

Mu Li 牡蠣 oyster shell Concha Ostreae

  • Heavy Shell Anchors Wind. There’s something to be said for calcium in the body. It neutralizes stomach acid, we all know that. Its also an important component for nerve conduction and by extension is implicated in the treatment of internal wind’s tics, tremors and convulsions. In TCM we think of this herb as actually weighing down the wind to cause it to stop blowing around.

Dan Shen 丹蔘 salvia root Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae, Salviae miltiorrhizae Radix [caution]

  • Cools Blood, Calms Spirit. This is another spirit calming herb that also improves blood circulation. Blood stagnation is the outcome of just about any long-term problem.

Ye Jiao Teng Caulis Polygoni Multiflori – Unblocks channels and dispels Wind-Dampness

Di Long 地龍 earthworm; lumbricus Lumbricus [use caution if pregnant] This is not always available. If you want it in your formula then check the add-on’s at the bottom of the page. There is no added cost.

  • Opens Channels, Relaxes Limbs. This is another herb that resembles sushi. It is the earth worm. Its ability to create tubes in the dirt are thought to apply to the acupuncture channels as well. As such, it treats spasms and convulsions by its ability to open the channels in much the same way as a flowing freeway will cause less cars to overheat (and spasm to a halt) than a traffic jam. I know that’s a stretch, but what do you want? It’s a worm, not a very romantic herb.

Tian Ma 天麻 gastrodia rhizome Rhizoma Gastrodiae Elatae

  • Extinguishes Wind, Stops Spasms. This is probably the most potent and famous of all wind extinguishing herbs in the Chinese pharmacopeia. It is often used to lower hypertension (high blood pressure) as well.

Wu Wei Zi 五味子 schisandra fruit Schizandrae Fructus

  • Sour Flavor Calms Tremors. This sour herb helps to moisturize the liver which helps settle down internal wind. It also calms in general. Teamed up with Zhi Gan Cao below, it is said to generate yin or body fluids.

Chai Hu 柴胡 hare’s ear root, thorowax root, bupleurum Radix Bupleuri [caution]

  • Spreads Qi, Removes Frustration. This herb works with Bai Shao to help spread and circulate the qi. This ends up looking a little bit like calming the nervous system from the biomedical perspective.

Sha Ren 砂仁 amomum fruit, grains-of-paradise fruit Fructus Amomi [supports pregnancy]

  • Protects Stomach From Heaviness. All of those heavy ingredients used to extinguish wind can be a little difficult to digest and cause a heavy sensation in the tummy after you take this formula. This herb addresses that side effect.

Zhi Gan Cao 炙甘草 licorice root Radix Glycyrrhizae prep. [caution]

  • Sweetly Sedates Side Effects. This herb is often added to formulas to harmonize the ingredients and soften side-effects. Basically, this herb makes everything work a little bit more slowly and gently. The sweet flavor associated with this herb mixed with the sour of Bai Shao and Wu Wei Zi (both herbs listed above) is said to generate body fluids which help address the underlying cause of the internal wind that this formula treats.

_____________ more notes_____________

These are issues using the herbs in this formula. Most are experiments done with rats but the issue of using these with interferon (very serious), barbiturates, high blood pressure and blood thinners should be looked at carefully.

BAI SHAO (White Peony Root) Note to physicians: Bai Shao has been shown to have a mild inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation and prevention of emboli formation. Therefore, it should be taken with caution by patients who are on anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs such as heparin, warfarin (Coumadin) and enoxaparin (Lovenox); antiplatelet drugs include aspirin, dipyridamole (Persantine), and clopidogrel (Plavix). Source: Chen J. Recognition & Prevention of herb-drug interactionsMedical Acupuncture, Fall/Winter 1998/1999; volume 10/number 2;9-13

Note to physicians: Bai Shao should be used with caution in patients who are taking insulin, sulfonylureas, and other antidiabetic medications as the combination may have synergistic effects, leading to hypoglycemia. Examples of antidiabetic drugs include insulin, tolbutamide (Orinase), glipizide (Blucotrol), and glyburide (DiaBeta/Micronase). Source: Chen J. Recognition & Prevention of herb-drug interactionsMedical Acupuncture, Fall/Winter 1998/1999; volume 10/number 2;9-13

Note to physicians: Bai Shao has sedative and analgesic effects on the central nervous system. It prolonged the sleeping time induced by barbiturates, and has a protective effect against seizures induced by cardiazol. Drug categories that induce sedation, such as antihistamines, narcotic analgesics, barbiturates, and benzodiazepines. For this reason, caution should be used in patients who are already using these drugs to avoid excessive sleeping time, etc. Source: Zhong Yao Tong Bao (Journal of Chinese Herbology), 1985; 10(6):43

GOU TENG (Gambir) Note to physicians: Gou Teng reverses the stimulating effect of caffeine, but does not potentiate the sedative effect of barbiturates. Source: Zhong Yao Yao Li Yu Ying Yong (Pharmacology and Applications of Chinese Herbs), 1983;786

DAN SHEN (Salvia Root) Note to physicians: Dan Shen has a exaggerates the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of warfarin, according to studies conducted in rats. Drugs that will probably be impacted include heparin, warfarin (Coumadin) and enoxaparin (Lovenox); antiplatelet drugs include aspirin, dipyridamole (Persantine), and clopidogrel (Plavix). [Source]

WU WEI ZI (Schisandra Fruit) Note to physicians: Wu Wei Zi has been found to significantly counteract cycloheximide-induced amnesia in rats. The beneficial effect of the herb is amplified by treatment with serotonergic receptor antagonists, but reduced by serotonergic receptor agonists as well as GABA(A) and cholinergic receptor antagonists. [Source]

TIAN MA (Rhizoma Gastrodiae) Note to physicians: Tian ma may potentiate the sedative effects of barbiturates. Drug categories that may interact with tian ma include antihistamines, narcotic analgesics, barbiturates, and benzodiazepines. For this reason, caution should be used in patients who are already using these drugs to avoid excessive sleeping time, etc. Source: Zhong Guo Yi Xue Ke Xue Xue Bao (Journal of Chinese Medical Science University), 1989; 11(2):147

CHAI HU (Radix Bupleuri) Note to physicians: Chai hu has some overlap in function as interferon therapy which can be quite problematic medically. Chai hu should not be taken under any circumstances while on interferon therapy. [Source]

SHA REN (Cardamon) Note to physicians: Sha Ren has an antiplatelet effect. Although this potential interaction has not been documented, sha ren should be taken with caution by patients who are on anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs such as heparin, warfarin (Coumadin) and enoxaparin (Lovenox); antiplatelet drugs include aspirin, dipyridamole (Persantine), and clopidogrel (Plavix). Source: Chen J. Recognition & Prevention of herb-drug interactionsMedical Acupuncture, Fall/Winter 1998/1999; volume 10/number 2;9-13

ZHI GAN CAO (licorice root) This herb is often added to formulas to harmonize the ingredients and soften side effects. Basically, this herb makes everything work a little bit more slowly and gently. The sweet flavor associated with this herb mixed with the sour of Bai Shao and Wu Wei Zi (both herbs listed above) is said to generate body fluids which help address the underlying cause of the internal wind that this formula treats.

Note to physicians: Gan Cao should be used with caution with cardiac glycosides, such as digoxin (Lanoxin), as potassium loss may increase the toxicity of the drug. Source: Wichtl, M. Herbal Drugs and Phytopharmaceuticals, 1994

Note to physicians: Gan Cao speeds the metabolism of drugs such as chloral hydrate, urethane, cocaine, picrotoxin, caffeine, pilocarpine, nicotine, and barbiturates, and treats overdose of these agents. Source: Zhong Yao Tong Bao (Journal of Chinese Herbology), 1986; 11(10):55

Note to physicians: Overdose or chronic use of Gan Cao may cause edemaelevated blood pressureweak extremitiesnumbnesssodium retentionpotassium lossdizziness, and headache.

Note to physicians: Gan cao may alter the therapeutic effects of systemic corticosteroids such as cortisone, prednisone (Orasone), dexamethasone (Decadron), hydrocortisone (Cortef), methylprednisolone (Medrol). Source: Lancet 2000 Jan 8; 355(9198):134-8

 

Adult Dosage

This formula can be used to support health with or without symptoms. If symptoms are present, take 1 level teaspoon of the powder (8 capsules) three times daily. When symptoms are not present, take 1/2 level teaspoon (4 capsules), two times daily. Empty stomach is best for efficient absorption, but not essential. [More…]

At this dosage, your order will last approximately this long (?):

  • 50 grams powder (capsules only): 4 to 14 days.
  • 100 grams powder (capsules or powder): 8 to 25 days
  • 200 grams powder (powder only): 19 to 56 days
Shipping
Shipping Rate: A

Availability status: in stock

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