Details of Atractylodes and Dioscorea Combination
picture of shan yao herb
Shan yao is a Chinese yam supports the respiratory, digestive, and excretory systems.

A triple-action recipe to help you hit that sweet spot between too wet and too dry.

Action 1: supports efficient digestion which is the first step in healthy fluid metabolism (leading to a discharge-free day!)

Action 2: regulates the enteric nervous system in support of healthy digestion and fluid metabolism. This targets the stress-induced aspect of vaginal discharge.

Action 3: regulates the plumbing downstairs (ugh! The things I have to say to avoid making medical claims) meaning that some of the ingredients directly target dripping structures.

Is this formula specifically anti-candida or anti-yeast infection? I don’t know that. The important thing to keep in mind is that these two terms are narratives based on Western medicine that are somewhat irrelevant to what you really want, which is to be appropriately moist, but not leaking. If that is your goal, you’re on the right page.

Chinese medicine also suggests different formulas for different kinds of discharge. This formula favors discharge that has any or all of the following qualities:

  • odorless discharge
  • clear, white, or pale-yellow colored discharge
  • thin or watery discharge

If your discharge is deep yellow or has a strong odor, you need something different. If the discharge is thick, like cooked egg whites or cottage cheese, pay attention to the color and odor as they will help you decide which direction to go. We now have a pretty graphic to help guide you to the correct recipe. Check out the “vaginal discharge” category page.

Alternative Names

  • Wán Dài Tāng
  • Wan Dai Tang
  • End Discharge Decoction
  • Wan Tai Tang
  • Atractylodes and Schizonepeta Combination
  • Treating Morbid Leukorrhea Decoction
  • 完帶湯

Ingredients

Bai Zhu 白术 bai shu ovate atractylodes, Rhizoma Atractylodes Macrocephala

  • This herb has oodles of healthy functions which are accentuated by its processing. In this case, the bai zhu is dry-fried in yellow earth (the soil found near the Yellow River). Yellow is a color often associated with the digestion which is also referred to as the “earth element” in the body. So yellow soil is really great natural processing for this herb to help it better support the digestion in such a way as to promote healthy fluid metabolism. When there is weak digestion, the outcome is called “dampness” which you would recognize as gurgling, indigestion, nausea, and should this dampness descend downstairs: vaginal discharge

Shan Yao 山藥 dioscorea rhizome, Chinese yam Dioscoreae Rhizoma

  • This herb is also dry-fried in this formula. It supports the digestion which, when working efficiently, does not produce extra fluids in the body that can seep out of one’s nether regions.

Ren Shen 人蔘 ginseng root Radix Panax Ginseng

  • Another herb that stongly supports the organs in charge of fluid metabolism, including the digestion (when this isn’t working, you can hear extra fluids in your belly) and the kidneys (which is kind of obvious as this organ is in charge of the fluid metabolism througout the body).

Cang Zhu 蒼术 atractylodes rhizome, cang shu Atractylodis Rhizoma

  • There are many ways to address a fluid metabolism problem in the body. This herb is considered “aromatic” and has a drying effect on the sensations of too much water in the stomach and intestines.

Chen Pi 陳皮 aged tangerine peel, citrus Citri reticulatae Pericarpium

  • This is dried tangerine peel which is aromatic like cang zhu above, but it also stimulates circulation of qi which is like saying that it regulates the nervous system in charge of keeping things moving in the intestines. When things get stagnated, more dampness is produced. This herb helps to shut off that valve that is generating the gooey fluids that are leaking out downstairs.

Che Qian Zi 車前子 plantago seeds Semen Plantaginis

  • Another herb to address stagnant fluids in the body. The mechanism is that it simply supports the kidney functions of eliminating a healthy quantity of fluids to prevent them from backing up elsewhere in the body.

Bai Shao 白芍 white peony root, peony Paeoniae Radix alba [supports pregnancy]

  • Inefficient digestion often arises as a response to stress. This white peony root helps regulate the nervous system such that the digestion can work more efficiently. We say it “calms the liver”. A moody liver often takes out its frustrations on the digestive organs (leading to dampness pouring downward to one’s vaginal region.)

Chai Hu 柴胡 hare’s ear root, thorowax root, bupleurum Radix Bupleuri [caution]

  • Chai Hu (Bupleurum) is often teamed up with Bai Shao above. They work together to keep the nervous system (or “liver qi”) regulated and relaxed.

Charred Jing Jie 荊芥 schizonepeta stem or bud Herba seu Flos Schizonepetae Tenuifoliae

Gan Cao 甘草 licorice root Radix Glycyrrhizae [caution]

  • This herb is added to get all the other herbs working together. Think of it as a kind and gentle person in a group of loud voices. With licorice root added, the loud voices calm down a bit and actually listen to each other.
Recommended for these body types:
Balanced
Balanced
Slightly Delicate
Slightly Delicate

Delicate
Delicate
Recommended for these thermal natures:
Neutral
Neutral
Cool
Cool

Cold
Cold
<span=”RecommendedDoseSchedule”>Adult Dosage

This formula is best used only when there are chills. If symptoms are present, take 1 level teaspoon of the powder (8 capsules) three times daily. Empty stomach is best for efficient absorption, but not essential. [More…]

At this dosage, your order will last approximately this long (?):

  • 50 grams powder (capsules only): 4 to 14 days.
  • 100 grams powder (capsules or powder): 8 to 25 days
  • 200 grams powder (powder only): 19 to 56 days
Shipping
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Availability status: in stock

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